Bits & Bytes

Posts Tagged ‘visual studio’

Creating a C# Console Application in Visual Studio 2013

This post explains how to create a simple console application in C# and make it print out a message. Console applications are the simplest applications. So, this is the perfect place to start if you have no prior knowledge of C#.

  1. Navigate to the Start menu by left-clicking the Windows icon in the lower-left corner of your Desktop screen.
    Desktop
  2. Then left-click the down arrow in the lower-left corner to go the Apps section and find the Visual Studio 2013 icon.
  3. Left-click the Visual Studio 2013 icon to open the Visual Studio 2013 application.
    StartMenu
  4. Left-click FILE in the menubar, mouse over New in the submenu, and left-click Project in the submenu to open the New Project dialog.
    NewProject
  5. Select Installed->Templates->Visual C#->Windows in the left-hand pane.
    Installed_Templates
  6. Then left-click Console Application in the center pane.
    ConsoleAppplication
  7. If you want to accept the default project name and location, left-click the OK button to finish creating the console application. Otherwise, you can first:
    1. Set the name of the project in the field next to “Name:” near the bottom of the dialog.
    2. Select a location by left-clicking the “Browse” button.
  8. Now the project is created. To get the program to do something, add the line
    Console.WriteLine("God is Love!");

    to the code file “Program.cs” so that the final code looks like this:

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    
    namespace ConsoleApplication {
        class Program {
            static void Main(string[] args) {
                Console.WriteLine("God is Love!");
            }
        }
    }
    
  9. To compile and run the program, left-click DEBUG in the menubar and left-click Start Without Debugging in the submenu.
    StartWithoutDebugging
  10. When the program finishes compiling and runs, a console window should open like this one with the message “God is Love!” inside of it.
    Output

Keeping the C++ Console Window Open

One of the first problems that new C++ programmers have is keeping the console window open when writing C++ programs. The easiest solution to this problem is to use the Start Without Debugging option under the Debug the when executing programs. Unfortunately, Microsoft took this option and many others out of the default menus in Visual C++ 2010. To get this option back, select Tools->Settings->Expert Settings. Otherwise, you can use press (Ctrl + F5) to select Start Without Debugging without the menu.

That’s the simplest option for keeping the console window open. However, if you want to keep the window open when running an executable that you create, you will need to add some code to suspend execution and keep the window open. Below, we show one example of how to keep the window open by adding this line of code before the return statement:

system("pause");

The one objection I have to this method is that the system() function is not part of the C++ standard and may not be valid with some C++ compilers.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    cout << "Hello World!" << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Alternatively, we could use cin.get(); to keep the window open like this:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    cout << "Hello World!" << endl;

    cin.get();
    return 0;
}

However, using cin.get() can have problems if input is taken directly before it. The problem is that the input in the stream carries over to the cin.get() and causes the program to exit. To prevent this, we can add a call to clear() and ignore(), as we do below.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    int iInt;
    cin >> iInt;
    cout << "Input = " << iInt << endl;

    cin.clear();
    cin.ignore(0xFFFFFFFF, '\n');
    cin.get();
    return 0;
}